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Brilliant Blunders: From Darwin to Einstein–Colossal Mistakes by Great Scientists That Changed Our Understanding of Life and the Universe [by Mario Livio] ______________________________ (February lectures list is at bottom of this page.)

Brilliant Blunders

Recently I read that a professor would begin his course by telling his class, “Plato is smarter than you.” This reminder is one I bear in mind when I read the Bible, but it was also apt this past month as I was reading Mario Livio’s Brilliant Blunders: From Darwin to Einstein–Colossal Mistakes by Great Scientists That Changed Our Understanding of Life and the Universe.

Without arrogance, Livio relates the scientific errors of some of the giants of science–first, introducing his theme by mentioning Aristotle’s blunder of assuming that objects fall to their “natural” place and Freud’s unfounded assumption that women have an “infantile Oedipus complex.” Livio’s book focuses on the blunders of Darwin, Lord Kelvin, Watson and Crick, Fred Hoyle, and Einstein. (It’s reassuring to know even geniuses argue with faith in the data they accept.)

Darwin’s error in presuming that offspring receive a “blend” from the parents caused his theory of evolution later to be generally rejected until scientists learned that Mendel’s experiments with sweet peas proved that something other than (Darwin’s) “blending” was causing characteristics to be transmitted to offspring. Livio respects Darwin, but the story reaffirmed for me that a science paradigm (the narrative embraced by scientists) will be tenaciously defended–even when proven to be problematic or incorrect.

Livio’s account of Lord Kelvin’s blunder examines this scientist without the trepidation that Livio had to keep in mind while exposing Darwin’s error. Instead, Livio depicts Kelvin as a dictatorial scientist (and a foolish Christian) unwilling to consider data that countered his calculations that the earth was not old enough for evolution to have occurred. Kelvin assumed that the earth cools thermodynamically at an unchanging rate, and he argued that the earth and sun were young by using scientists’ nineteenth-century understanding that gravitation collapses the sun, producing its energy. (It was only years later that other scientists developed the new theory that the sun’s power was produced by nuclear fusion).

Livio presents Linus Pauling as an overly ambitious scientist who struggled to become first to discover the structure of DNA, and his blunder that he determined that DNA has the form of a triple helix (I admit that I was unaware that Pauling had worked on DNA). Watson and Crick’s recognition of the double helix structure was later corroborated by the X-ray photography of DNA that had been done by Rosalyn Franklin, but “although she did not object in principle to helical structures, she absolutely refused to assume their existence as a working hypothesis.” Livio notes that her death to cancer likely was caused by her X-ray research.

Livio also recounts Einstein’s error in formulating his “cosmological constant,” but the author handles Einstein with more esteem than he grants to astronomer Fred Hoyle who coined the term “The Big Bang.” Hoyle rejected that cosmology, saying that there never was a “beginning.” Instead, he persistently argued for a steady state model even though data supported “The Big Bang.” This is yet another example of a great scientist using his data to substantiate what later is learned to be incorrect. Hoyle’s achievements, though, included proving what seems like alchemy–that fusion in stars forms elements, notably carbon, which has spawned the much-repeated quip that we humans are all made of stardust.

Reading Livio reminded me that science at all stages says that it does not have Truth with a capital “T.” Scientists, however, are rarely open to ideas that challenge the current “truth.”

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February Upcoming Lectures

Feb. 1 (Sat.) 10:00 a.m.–“Writing Your Memoir.” Free lecture. Author Liz Coursen. Daytona Beach City Island Library, 105 E. Magnolia Avenue. Call 257-6036 ext. 16264 for details. Click to see webpage.

Feb. 1 (Sat.) 1 p.m.–“Humble Giants: Florida’s Manatee (history, ecology, favorite local habitats, and conservation efforts) .” Free presentation. Dr. Katie Tripp, Director of Science and Conservation with the Save the Manatee Club. Attendees will receive handouts and a free 2014 manatee calendar. New Smyrna Beach Library, 101 South Dixie Freeway (U.S. 1). Call 386-424-2910, option 4 for details.

Feb. 1 (Sat.) 2:00 p.m.–Presentation of first-person remembrances of segregation in Florida from the late 1930’s to the Civil Rights Era. [Topics will include Volusia County Rosenwald Schools, Jacksonville’s 1960 sit-in, Ft. Lauderdale’s 1961 “wade-in,” the exclusion of Jews from hotels all over the state, the integration of Florida schools, and Pat Frank’s famous science fiction novel Alas, Babylon (1959) set in central Florida]. Free lecture. Author Liz Coursen. Daytona Beach City Island Library, 105 E. Magnolia Avenue. Call 257-6036 ext. 16264 for details. Click to see webpage.

Feb. 3 (Mon.) 5:45 p.m.–Lecture with 2 Speakers. Stuart Buchanan, a Winter Park attorney, will speak about his grandfather, Howard Buchanan, former South Daytona Mayor and owner of Buck’s Barn of South Daytona. Tim Carner will speak about the Carners’ (family-owned) Gil’s BBQ of Ormond Beach (in the 1960’s) and Sonny’s BBQ in South Daytona and his personal management of Backyard Boys BBQ. Free lecture. South Daytona Piggotte Community Center, 504 Big Tree Road. South Daytona Historical Society monthly lecture series. Click to see webpage.

Feb. 4 (Tues.) 7:00-8:00–Documentary “Created Equal: The Loving Story” about Richard and Mildred Loving whose conviction in Virginia for interracial marriage was overturned by the Supreme Court, and anti-miscegenation laws were declared unconstitutional. This is the second of two documentaries before 13 February discussion program. Free. Stetson University, Library Auditorium (Room 25L), 421 N. Woodland Blvd., DeLand. Call 386-822-7178 for details or e-mail jmartin2@stetson.edu. Click to see webpage.

Feb. 4 (Tues.) 7:00-8:00–Lecture: “Playing the God-Game: A tale of Two Christian Athletes,” George H. Shriver annual lecture series on Religion in American History. Free lecture. Stetson University, Carlton Union Building (Stetson Room, upstairs), 421 N. Woodland Blvd., DeLand. Call 386-822-8932 for details or e-mail mreddish@stetson.edu. Click to see webpage.

Feb. 5 (Wed.) Noon-1:00Lecture: “Beyond the Scoreboard: Tackling the Tough Issues,” George H. Shriver annual lecture series on Religion in American History. Free lecture. Stetson University, Carlton Union Building (Stetson Room, upstairs), 421 N. Woodland Blvd., DeLand. Call 386-822-8932 for details or e-mail mreddish@stetson.edu. Click to see webpage.

Feb. 5 (Wed.) 7:00-8:00–Lecture: “Taking the Face: How Sport Becomes a Religion,” George H. Shriver annual lecture series on Religion in American History. Free lecture. Stetson University, Carlton Union Building (Stetson Room, upstairs), 421 N. Woodland Blvd., DeLand. Call 386-822-8932 for details or e-mail mreddish@stetson.edu. Click to see webpage.

Feb. 5 (Wed.) 5 p.m.–“Fire and Water: Confessions of a Hedonistic Ecologist.” Dr. John Fauth, professor of biology, University of Central Florida. Free lecture. Daytona State College, Madorsky Theater in the Mori Hosseini Center (building next to International Speedway Blvd, 1200 West International Speedway Blvd. Call 506-3779 for details. Click to see webpage.

Feb. 7 (Fri.) 1 p.m.–The history of the “Measured Mile” where the land speed records were set and broken on the “World’s Most Famous Beach.” Free lecture. Port Orange History Lecture Series. Kent Donahue, Port Orange Public Information Officer and Grants Manager. Adult Center Annex, 3738 Halifax Drive, Port Orange. Call 386-506-5522 for details.

Feb. 11 (Tues.) 4 p.m.–“Freemanville Day Ceremony.” Free Event. Mt. Moriah Baptist Church, 941 N. Orange Ave., Port Orange. Hosted by the City of Port Orange in partnership with Mt. Moriah Baptist Church and the Port Orange Historical Trust. (“Since this is a small historic church, seating is limited, so get there early.”) The ceremony will include music by Bethune-Cookman University students Marquis Thompkins and Courtnee James, accompanied by Dr. Rose Grace, BC-U Professor of Piano. Call 386-506-5522 for details. To read the history of Freemanville (1866-1910), click here. To read the history of Freemanville (1920-2014), click here.

Feb. 12 (Wed.) 5 p.m.–“The Effects of Light Polarization and How To Teach It to an Audience Aged 4 to 75.” Dr. Boris Y Zeldovich, The College of Optics and Photonics, University of Central Florida. Free lecture. Daytona State College, Madorsky Theater in the Mori Hosseini Center (building next to International Speedway Blvd, 1200 West International Speedway Blvd. Call 506-3779 for details. Click to see webpag

Feb. 13 (Thurs.) 1:30–“”Unpuzzling Ireland’s Church Records.” Donna Moughty, professional genealogist and speaker. Halifax Genealogical Society meeting. Ormond Beach Library auditorium, 30 South Beach Street. Call 672-3806 for details. Click to see webpage.

Feb. 13 (Thurs.) 7:00-8:30–“The Evolution of Social Customs and Mores (The Evolution of American Culture series).” Presentation and Attendees’ Discussion. Dr. Nancy Scherr. Unitarian Universalist Society, Ormond Beach, 56 North Halifax Drive. Call 672-2556 for details. Click to see webpage.

Feb. 13 (Thurs.) 7:00-8:30–Panel Discussion on “Inequality Under the Law.” Program will feature clips from two documentaries: “Slavery by Another Name” and “The Loving Story.” Panel participants Dr. Susan Peppers-Bayes, Dr. Joshua Rust, and Dr. Wayne Bailey will then lead a discussion. Free. Stetson University, Carlton Union Building (Stetson Room, upstairs), 421 N. Woodland Blvd., DeLand. Call 386-822-7178 for details or e-mail jmartin2@stetson.edu. Click to see webpage.

Feb. 18 (Wed.) 7:30-8:30–“Why Be an Engineer?” Dan Korte, former Rolls Royce-Defense president and former Boeing Vice President. , Dan Korte. (Topic: What has made technical professionals successful in transition from the academic to the corporate world, including insights into successful areas of focus while still in college, how to set oneself apart in a job search and then the factors that can help lead to a successful career). Embry-Riddle University, Gale Lemerand Auditorium, inside the Willie Miller Instructional Center,

Feb. 19 (Thurs.) 5 p.m.–“The World Before Higgs.” Dr. Pierre Ramond, Director, Institute of Fundamental Theory, University of Florida. Daytona State College, Madorsky Theater in the Mori Hosseini Center (building next to International Speedway Blvd, 1200 West International Speedway Blvd. Call 506-3779 for details. Click to see webpage.

Feb. 20 (Thurs.) 6:30–History of the Career of NSB’s former mayor George Musson (for whom the North Causeway Bridge is named). Speaker: Jill Musson Williams, daughter of George Musson. New Smyrna Museum of History, 120 Sams Avenue (from Canal Street in downtown NSB, turn north onto Sams Ave. One block from Canal St.). Free. Call 386-478-0052 for details.

UPDATED WITH TOPIC INFORMATION–Feb. 20 (Thurs.) (Video at 5:15) (Speaker at 6:15) –Science Cafe at Cinematique. “Drones–The Sky Is the Limit.” Video–(5:15-6:15)–NOVA Science “Rise of the Drones”–Rare access to drone engineers and those who fly them for the U.S. military, NOVA reveals the amazing technologies that make drones so powerful. Speaker–(6:15-7:15)–Dr. Ron Morrison, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, will discuss how military drone manufacturers are looking for civilian uses for remote sensing drones to expand their civilian markets, making possible the dramatic expansion of the “surveillance state.” at Cinematique, 242 South Beach Street, Daytona Beach. Call 252-3778 for details. Click to see webpage.

DATE CHANGED–Feb. 21 (Fri.) 1:30 p.m. (not Feb. 25 at 10:30 a.m., as previously scheduled)–History Book Club at the NS Museum. Dave Borland will read from his latest book In A Moment’s Time. New Smyrna Museum of History, 120 Sams Avenue (from Canal Street in downtown NSB, turn north onto Sams Ave. One block from Canal St.). Free. Also, free refreshments. Call 386-478-0052 for details.

Feb. 26 (Wed.) 5 p.m.–“Recent Advances in Gene Therapy.” Dr. Yoon-Seong Kim, UCF Burnett School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Central Florida. Daytona State College, Madorsky Theater in the Mori Hosseini Center (building next to International Speedway Blvd, 1200 West International Speedway Blvd. Call 506-3779 for details. Click to see webpage.

Mar. 3 (Mon.) 5:45 p.m.–Martin Doughney’s Remembrances of Frank Doughney, former South Daytona Police Chief, First of Three Generations in Law Enforcement.” Free lecture. South Daytona Piggotte Community Center, 504 Big Tree Road. South Daytona Historical Society monthly lecture series. Click to see webpage.

Mar. 5 (Wed.) 5 p.m.–“Emerging Pathogens.” Dr. J. Glenn Morris, Jr., Professor and Director, Emerging Pathogens Institute, University of Florida. Daytona State College, Madorsky Theater in the Mori Hosseini Center (building next to International Speedway Blvd, 1200 West International Speedway Blvd. Call 506-3779 for details. Click to see webpage.

Mar. 7 (Fri.) 1 p.m.–History lecture about former Mayor Jim Fisher (recently deceased). Free lecture. Port Orange History Lecture Series. Kent Donahue, Port Orange Public Information Officer and Grants Manager. Adult Center Annex, 3738 Halifax Drive, Port Orange. Call 386-506-5522 for details.


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Books on Seed-saving, Southern Childhood, and Hiking to See Georgia Waterfalls (Lecture List is at bottom of this screen)

The reading life is one of solitude. We generally read alone and find limited ways to share what we’ve learned, so in this blog I plan to share some ideas from my book life. My interests range from good literature to the sciences, and my books include Thoreau, Shakespeare, philosophy, popularized science books, and books of history, especially local history.

For decades my wife and I have begun our days in silent, yet shared, reading time in our Bibles along with silent prayer. When our Florida mornings are warm enough, I choose to sit on the patio with a view of greenery, birds, squirrels, and my constant companions–anoles, both brown and green lizards that eye me and go about their hunting. When the mornings are crisp or cold, I join my wife, each in our “Bible chairs” with handy tables for our coffee.

This year when I knew that I wouldn’t be attending the Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings annual conference, I decided to read books by the keynote speaker, Janisse Ray, a natural storyteller whose style blends science, ecology, history, autobiography, and an advocacy for living mindfully. Her book The Seed Underground: A Growing Revolution to Save Food inspired me to save seeds of our pok choy plants in my little backyard garden, and I plan to live out her proposal to make the vegetables I grew live beyond their own useful lives by planting their “children” in our garden. Her collection of connected essays will interest those who enjoy Henry David Thoreau and Wendell Berry.

I had become acquainted with the award-winning Janisse Ray in her Seed Underground book, but when I read her autobiographical Ecology of a Cracker Childhood, I knew her better than many people I’ve known for years. She recounts her early years living in her father’s junkyard along U.S. 1 in Bailey, Georgia; and her narrative took me into the impoverished, yet worthy, life of this woman who grew to know the world and nature with an intimacy that caused me to relive many of my own childhood experiences.

This autumn my wife and I headed toward the north Georgia mountains for a five-day vacation to enjoy hiking to see the turning leaves, and we paused in Baxley along the railroad tracks, likely near where Janisse Ray’s grandmother had had a small restaurant that the author recalls with poignancy in her book. Then as we headed farther north on U.S. 1 I pulled off the highway first at one junkyard and then at another smaller one, wondering if one of these could be the site of her memorable experiences of growing up in Georgia. But quickly we were on our way to see God’s handiwork in the impressive waterfalls of Tallulah Gorge, and to walk the mile and half along Moccassin Creek with its numerous small falls, and to Vogel State Park to hike around the lake to see its delightful waterfall, then to Dahlonega and on to Amicalola where my wife and I hiked the forest trail alone up to the top of Amicalola Falls which cascades in a series of separate waterfalls that give a new view every fifty feet or so as you walk the 700 foot descent to the area where the water pools into lovely ponds and then continues as a creek. Janisse Ray’s books had prepared me to enjoy Georgia with new views.


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January Upcoming Lectures

Jan. 6 (Mon.) 5:45 p.m.–Retired radio host and author Dave Archard–Presentation on the cultural history of local radio station WELE and dj “Kingbird” and his country music radio programs. South Daytona Piggotte Community Center, 504 Big Tree Road. South Daytona Historical Society monthly lecture series. Click to see webpage.

NEWLY ADDED–Jan. 9 (Thurs.) 1:30–Program on how to use ancestral facts (names, places, dates) to make interesting stories without fictionalizing the material. Author Patricia Charpentier. Halifax Genealogical Society meeting. Ormond Beach Library, 30 South Beach Street. Call 672-3806 for details. Click to see webpage.

Jan. 9 (Thurs.) 3:00-4:00–“The Nature of Art (how art evolves from the natural world)” Chief Curator and Curator of Decorative Arts, Cythia Duval. Paid admission. Free for members of the Daytona Beach Museum of Arts and Sciences,  352 South Nova Road, Daytona Beach. Call 255-0285 for details. Click to see webpage.

Jan. 9 (Thurs.) 7:00-8:30–“Major Developments in American Education from 17th Century Colonial Days to the Present from a Standpoint of Cultural Influences.” Dr. Dan Kennedy. Unitarian Universalist Society, Ormond Beach, 56 North Halifax Drive. Call 672-2556 for details.

Jan. 10 (Fri.) 1:00–“The History of the Dunlawton Sugar Mill” (1830-today, including the Second Seminole War and the concrete dinosaurs). Kent Donahue, Port Orange Public Information Officer and Grants Manager. Adult Center Annex, 3738 Halifax Drive, Port Orange. Call 506-5522 for details.

NEWLY ADDED–Jan. 11 (Sat.) 10:00-4:00–“A Day in Florida History.” DeLeon Springs State Park (10 min. north of DeLand using U.S. 17)–Living history demonstrations, music, antique tractors, displays from local museums and historical societies. Program by professional storyteller, historian, and author Mary Fears. DeLeon Springs, 601 Ponce DeLeon Blvd. $6 per car (2-8 people), $4 single occupant. [Information from Daytona Beach News-Journal] Call 386-985-4212 for details. Click to see webpage.

NEWLY ADDEDJan. 13 (Mon.) 7 p.m.–History of Yaupon Holly and Its Benefits. Byron White, President of Yaupon Asi Tea. Florida Native Plant Society Pawpaw chapter meeting. Location discrepancy: News-Journal indicates–Piggotte Community Center, 504 Big Tree Road, South Daytona, but the society’s webpage indicates–James Street Recreation Center, 1700 James Street, South Daytona.. Call 212-9923 for details. Click to see society’s webpage.

Jan 16 (Thurs.)–Science Cafe at Cinematique, 242 South Beach Street, Daytona Beach–Program on land management through the eyes of an ecologist–how human interference has precluded natural processes and how necessary this now is to keep forests healthy. The program will consider Volusia’s Firestorm of 1998, the scrub restoration of the Doris Leeper Spruce Creek Preserve, and the Lyonia Environmental Learning Center in Deltona. Danny Young, Director of Environmental Services at Zev Cohen and Associates. At 5:15 video clips of PBS’s NOVA “The Secret Life of Scientists and Engineers.” At 6:15 will be Danny Young’s 60-minutes live-presentation, followed by a question-answer session. Call 252-3778 for details. Click to see webpage.

Jan. 17 (Fri.) 7 p.m.–Winter Sky Stargazer Series with Dr. Jason Aufdenburg, Embry-Riddle physics professor and advisor of ERAU’s Amateur Astronomy Club will explain how telescopes work and present a Starry Night software simulation of the winter sky of Daytona, followed by a question-answer session and then outdoor viewing of selected celestial objects with the library’s new telescope. Daytona Beach City Island Library, 105 E. Magnolia Avenue. Call 257-6036 ext. 16264 for details. Click to see webpage.

Jan. 18 (Sat.) 1 p.m.–Right Whales presentation by the Marine Resources Council and the Right Whale Monitoring Program. New Smyrna Beach Library, 101 South Dixie Freeway (U.S. 1)–  Call 424-2910 for details, Option 4. Click to see webpage.

Jan. 22 (Wed.) 7:30 p.m.–Presentation: “Art and Engineering–The Bookends of Discovery” (on creativity and empathy in teaching and research)–Jamie Gillloly, University of Florida biology professor. At Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, 600 South Clyde Morris Blvd, Daytona Beach. Gale Lemerand Auditorium in the Willie Miller Instructional Center building. Call 226-6650 for details. Click to see webpage.

Jan. 24 (Fri.) 2 p.m.–Florida Black Bear presentation by Cathy Connolly, Florida Wildlife Conservation Commission. Port Orange Library, 1005 City Center Circle. Call 668-3835 for details. Click to see webpage.

NEWLY ADDED–Jan. 24 (Fri.) 5:00-7:00–Program on NASA Kennedy Space Center Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo space flights. Speakers: Holmes Davis and Vince Clarida who worked on these space flight projects. Also, the new Space Exhibit “Bring Them Home Safely” will be on display. $5 includes wine and cheese (5:00) and program (5:30). Halifax Historical Society Museum, 252 South Beach Street, Daytona Beach. Ample free parking in Palmetto Avenue parking lot (behind the museum). Call 386-25506976 for details. Click to see webpage.

Jan. 25 (Sat.) 10 a.m.–Unionists in Confederate Florida–Presentation by Tracy Upchurch, Flagler College history professor. Anderson-Price Memorial Building, 42 North Beach Street, Ormond Beach. “Discover Our History” monthly lecture series. Click to see webpage.

Jan. 25 (Sat.) 2 p.m.–One-woman portrayal of Abigail Adams from her childhood to her marriage with John Adams in 1764. Descendant Joan Adams Fenton’s performance uses diaries and letters of the Adamses. Daytona Beach City Island Library, 105 E. Magnolia Avenue. Call 257-6036 ext. 16264 for details. Click to see webpage.

Jan. 25 (Sat.) 2 p.m.–History of the original Miami Marlins, 1956-1960  (Florida State League minor league team). Sam Zygner, baseball historian and author of The Forgotten Marlins will be joined by Dick Bunker who played for the Marlins in 1957 and 1958. New Smyrna Beach Library, 101 South Dixie Freeway (U.S. 1)–  Call 424-2910 for details, Option 4. Click to see webpage.

NEWLY ADDEDJan. 28 (Tues.) 7:00-8:30–Documentary”Created Equal: Slavery by Any Other Name”–about “neoslavery” and other forms of forced labor used by the South from the end of the Civil War until World War II. This is the first of two documentaries before 13 February discussion program. Free. Stetson University, Library Auditorium (Room 25L). Call 386-822-7178 for details or e-mail jmartin2@stetson.edu.

NEWLY ADDEDJan. 29 (Wed.) 2 p.m.–“The History of West Volusia County”–live presentation by local historians and authors, Ron and Alice Howell. Ormond Beach Public Library, 30 S. Beach St. Click to see Ron and Alice Howell’s webpage.

NEWLY ADDED–Jan. 29 (Wed.) 2 p.m.–Writers’ workshop on how to write romance novels–designed for beginning writers. Workshop leaders: Florida authors Veronica Hart, Lois Gerber and Joan King. The third in the library’s writers’ workshop series. Daytona Beach City Island Library, 105 East Magnolia Avenue. Call 257-6036 ext. 16264 for details. Click to see webpage.

Jan. 29 (Wed.) 3:00-4:00–“Florida’s Long Lost Roadside Tourist Attractions (including Pirates World Theme Park and the Seville Peacock Farm).” Senior Curator of Education and Curator of History, James “Zack” Zacharias. Paid admission. Free for members of the Daytona Beach Museum of Arts and Sciences,  352 South Nova Road, Daytona Beach. Call 255-0285 for details. Click to see webpage.

Jan. 29 (Wed.) 5 p.m.–DNA Nanotechnology and Nucleic Acid Analysis–Presentation by Dr. Dmitry Kolpashchikov, biomedical sciences professor at the University of Central Florida. Daytona State College, Madorsky Theater in the Mori Hosseini Center (building next to International Speedway Blvd, 1200 West International Speedway Blvd. Call 506-3779 for details. Click to see webpage.

Feb. 1 (Sat.) 10:00 a.m.–“Writing Your Memoir.” Free lecture. Author Liz Coursen. Daytona Beach City Island Library, 105 East Magnolia Avenue. Call 257-6036 ext. 16264 for details. Click to see webpage.

Feb. 1 (Sat.) 2:00 p.m.–“First-hand Accounts of Floridians Who Grew Up in the Civil Rights Era.” Free lecture. Author Liz Coursen. Daytona Beach City Island Library, 105 East Magnolia Avenue. Call 257-6036 ext. 16264 for details. Click to see webpage.

NEWLY UPDATED–Feb. 3 (Mon.) 5:45 p.m.–Lecture with 2 Speakers. Stuart Buchanan, a Winter Park attorney, will speak about his grandfather, Howard Buchanan, former South Daytona Mayor and owner of Buck’s Barn BBQ of South Daytona. Tim Carner will speak about the Carners’ (family-owned) Gil’s BBQ of Ormond Beach (in the 1960’s) and Sonny’s BBQ in South Daytona and his personal management of Backyard Boys BBQ. Free lecture. South Daytona Piggotte Community Center, 504 Big Tree Road. South Daytona Historical Society monthly lecture series. Click to see webpage.

NEWLY ADDEDFeb. 4 (Tues.) 7:00-8:00–Documentary “Created Equal: The Loving Story” about Richard and Mildred Loving whose conviction in Virginia for interracial marriage was overturned by the Supreme Court, and anti-miscegenation laws were declared unconstitutional. This is the second of two documentaries before 13 February discussion program. Free. Stetson University, Library Auditorium (Room 25L), 421 North Woodland Blvd., DeLand. Call 386-822-7178 for details or e-mail jmartin2@stetson.edu. Click to see webpage.

NEWLY ADDEDFeb. 4 (Tues.) 7:00-8:00–Lecture: “Playing the God-Game: A tale of Two Christian Athletes,” George H. Shriver annual lecture series on Religion in American History. Free lecture. Stetson University, Carlton Union Building (Stetson Room, upstairs), 421 North Woodland Blvd., DeLand. Call 386-822-8932 for details or e-mail mreddish@stetson.edu. Click to see webpage.

NEWLY ADDEDFeb. 5 (Wed.) Noon-1:00Lecture: “Beyond the Scoreboard: Tackling the Tough Issues,” George H. Shriver annual lecture series on Religion in American History. Free lecture. Stetson University, Carlton Union Building (Stetson Room, upstairs), 421 North Woodland Blvd., DeLand. Call 386-822-8932 for details or e-mail mreddish@stetson.edu. Click to see webpage.

NEWLY ADDEDFeb. 5 (Wed.) 7:00-8:00–Lecture: “Taking the Face: How Sport Becomes a Religion,” George H. Shriver annual lecture series on Religion in American History. Free lecture. Stetson University, Carlton Union Building (Stetson Room, upstairs), 421 North Woodland Blvd., DeLand. Call 386-822-8932 for details or e-mail mreddish@stetson.edu. Click to see webpage.

Feb. 5 (Wed.) 5 p.m.–“Fire and Water: Confessions of a Hedonistic Ecologist.” Dr. John Fauth, professor of biology, University of Central Florida. Free lecture. Daytona State College, Madorsky Theater in the Mori Hosseini Center (building next to International Speedway Blvd, 1200 West International Speedway Blvd. Call 506-3779 for details. Click to see webpage.